Thursday, April 22, 2010

Recent Discussion Papers by S. Bhaduri, CSSP

Saradindu Bhaduri, Hemant Kumar (2009)
Tracing the Motivation to Innovate: A Study of 'Grassroot' Innovators in India
Papers on Economics and Evolution, Max Planck Institute of Economics #0912
Abstract: Extrinsic motivations like intellectual property protections and fiscal incentives continue to occupy the centre stage in debates on innovation policies. Joseph Schumpeter had, however, argued that the motive to accumulate private property can only explain part of innovative activities. In his view, "the joy of creating, of getting things done" associated with the behavioural traits that "seek out difficulties…and takes delight in ventures" stand out as the most independent factor of behaviour in explaining the process of economic development, especially in early capitalist societies. Taking the case of 'grassroot' innovators in India, we re-examine the motivations behind innovative behaviour. We draw upon the literature on effectance motivation theory to construct operational indicators of extrinsic and intrinsic motivations. Interestingly, we find that pure extrinsic forms of motivation drive only a fraction of individual innovative behaviour. Also, importance of intrinsic motivation in guiding innovative behaviour is found to high when uncertainty is high. We accordingly draw a few policy implications.
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Amit Shovon Ray, Saradindu Bhaduri (2009)
CITD Discussion Paper No. 0904
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Saradindu Bhaduri, H. Worch (2008)
Papers on Economics and Evolution, Max Planck Institute of Economics #0804
Abstract: The theoretical literature identifies three important entrepreneurial dimensions, namely discovering new opportunities, responsiveness to uncertainty, and coordination of a firm. In the empirical literature, past experience has been identified as having an important influence on organizational behavior. This literature, however, focuses predominantly on the impact of experience on new opportunities using a resource-based view and human capital perspective. In contrast, we draw upon the cognitive science literature to argue that past experience shapes an entrepreneur's cognitive frame, and, hence, influences entrepreneurship in a more holistic manner. We provide econometric evidence of the impact of past experience on all three entrepreneurial dimensions from the small scale Indian pharmaceutical enterprises.
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Saradindu Bhaduri, Janashruti Chandra (2008)
Informal Values and Formal Policies: A study of Japanese Technology Policy and Significance for India
ICRIER Working Paper No. 219

Abstract: The main objective of this paper is to analyse some aspects of Japanese policy in the post World War-II period and understand how the various informal institutions (shared mental models) have influenced key dimensions of technology strategy with regard to the nature and trajectory of activities it sought to promote. Previous studies have mainly focused on industrial policy on the basis of the White Papers published by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI). Our study, in contrast, focuses exclusively on technology policies by examining the White Papers on Science and Technology (Kagakugijutsu Hakusho) published by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). We then endeavour to understand the significance of our findings for policy making in India. However, the limited scope of this undertaking makes our results indicative in nature.
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K. Chandrasekhar, Saradindu Bhaduri (2005)
Papers on Economics and Evolution, Max Planck Institute of Economics #0518
Abstract: Recently, it has been suggested that the process of economic development should ideally be viewed as a socioeconomic transformation. Such a view requires a comprehensive understanding of how agents learn and change their behaviour. However, these aspects have only been inadequately addressed in development theory. This paper argues that social-cognitive vicarious learning theories can become a useful methodological tool by incorporating a triadic interaction between personal factors (beliefs, values), behaviour and environment. Our analysis is based on a survey of the Indian trans-Himalayan regions. The development trajectory of these regions suggests that a proper understanding of the vicarious learning mechanism provides crucial insight into the speed of socioeconomic transformations. It also helps to identify appropriate change agents within a society and, in turn, underscores the need for a comprehensive, yet flexible, development policy framework.
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1 comment:

Ruch said...

Dear Dr. Bhaduri,
I tried to download a paper from your blog for research work. There seems to be some problem with the server and I could not download it. Could you please send me the soft copy of the article at ruchi@iiti.ac.in or ruchi.shm@gmail.com ?
The details of the paper are: Amit Shovon Ray, Saradindu Bhaduri (2009) Co-evolution of IPR Policy and technological Learning in Developing Countries: A Game-theoretic Model.
Thanks and regards,
Ruchi Sharma
http://www.iiti.ac.in/node/90