Thursday, October 19, 2017

Half-Day Workshop on Rethinking the Social Contract of Science | at JNU Convention Centre | 28th October 2017

Half-Day Workshop on Rethinking the Social Contract of Science

28th October 2017, 2 PM Onward

Venue: Lecture Hall-I, JNU Convention Centre, New Delhi


Workshop Programme

SESSION-I                            Chair: Mewa Singh, Editor-Dialogue

2 PM-4:15 PM

Introductory Remarks

Dhruv Raina, JNU

 

Introducing the Journal 'Dialogue: Science, Scientists, and Society' | Mewa Singh, Editor- Dialogue 

Economics of Research Funding in Sciences and Social Sciences | Saumen Chattopadhyay, JNU 

Thinking About Technical Skills and Livelihoods | D. Raghunandan, AIPSN 

Transforming Indian Science: Recent Initiatives in Science Education | Arvind, IISER-Mohali 

Institutions and Knowledge: The Sciences in India's Food, Agriculture, and Nutrition | Rajeswari S. Raina, SNU

4:15 PM- 4: 30 PM            TEA BREAK

SESSION-II                          ROUND TABLE 

Title: Knowledge Forms and Social Interests

Chair:  Dhruv Raina, JNU


Participants

Amitabha Mukherjee, DU

Anirban Chakraborti, JNU

Gurpreet Mahajan, JNU

Sneha S. Komath, JNU

Tabish Qureshi, JMI

 

4:30 PM- 6 PM                   HIGH TEA


This is to invite you to half a day deliberation at JNU as part of a series of meetings being held throughout the country on science and society. At JNU we see this as the first of the meetings that has an odd format - three to four presentations and then a round table discussion.

 
RSVP: omprasad14[@]gmail.com


Internet Researchers' Conference 2018 - Offline | Call for Session Proposals

Internet Researchers' Conference 2018 - Offline | Call for Session Proposals by Nov 12


Dear colleague,

Does being offline necessarily mean being disconnected? Beyond anxieties such as FOMO, being offline is also seen as disengagement from a certain milieu of the digital, an impediment to the way life is organised by and around technologies in general.

Being offline, however, is not the exception, as examples of internet shutdown and acts on online censorship illustrate the persistence and often alarming regularity of the offline even for the 'connected' sections of the population.

Who is offline, and is it a choice? The global project of bringing people online has spurred several commendable initiatives in expanding access to digital devices, networks, and content, and often contentious ones such as Free Basics / internet.org, which illustrate the intersectionalities of scale, privilege, and rights that we need to be mindful of when we imagine the offline.

Further, efforts to prioritise the use of digital technologies for financial transactions, especially since demonetisation, has led to a not-so-subtle equalisation of the 'online economy' with the 'formal economy'; thus recognising the offline as the zones of informality, corruption, and piracy. This contributes to the offline becoming invisible, and in many cases, illegal, rather than being recognised as a condition that necessarily informs what it means to be digital.

The experience of the internet for most users is mediated through prior and ongoing experiences of traditional media, and through cultural metaphors and cognitive frames that transcend more practical registers such as consumption and facilitation. How do we approach, study, and represent this disembodied internet – devoid of its hypertext, platforms, devices, it's nuts and bolts, but still tangible through engagement in myriad, personal, and often indiscernible ways.

For the third edition of the Internet Researchers' Conference (IRC18), we invite participants to critically discuss the *offline*.

We invite sessions that present or propose academic, applied, or creative works that explore social, economic, cultural, political, infrastructural, or aesthetic dimensions of the *offline*. 

Please submit sessions proposals by Sunday, *November 12*.

Conference details can be found here: https://cis-india.org/raw/irc18-offline-call.

Conference poster can be found here: https://cis-india.org/raw/irc18-offline-call/image/image_view_fullscreen.

Please write to us at raw@cis-india.org for any questions regarding the conference.

Warm regards,

sumandro

--
Sumandro Chattapadhyay
Research Director
The Centre for Internet and Society

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Indo-German Symposium on Science Communication | November 7, 2017 | at German Embassy, New Delhi



The German Embassy New Delhi cordially invites you to the

Indo-German Symposium on Science Communication
November 7, 2017, 3.30 pm onwards
German Embassy, New Delhi


Register now
 
Science Communication is an often underestimated, yet crucial part of science. The Indo-German Symposium on science communication invites students, scientists and practitioners from India and Germany to explore the possibilities of science communication. Questions like 'What makes good science communication?' 'Why is it important?' 'And how is it done?' will be addressed at the symposium.
 
A Keynote Lecture on "Science communication in the digital age: New opportunities, new players, new challenges" by Prof. Dr. Carsten Könneker, Editor-in-Chief of "Spektrum der Wissenschaft" and professor for science communication and science studies at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology will be followed by a panel discussion on "Exploring the Secrets of Successful Science Communication"
 
Panelists :
 
Dr. Radhika Mittal, Communication Strategist; Fellow, LBS National Academy of Administration, Mussoorie, India

Dr. Anett Richter, Citizen Science Expert, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research UFZ/ German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Germany
Ramaseshan Ramachandran, Physicist and freelance science journalist, New Delhi, India
Alexander Waschkau, Psychologist, podcaster, publisher, founder of „Hoaxilla", a popular podcast covering a variety of topics from a scientific viewpoint, Hamburg, Germany
 
Moderator: Heike Mock, Director of the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) India and Director of the German House for Research and Innovation (DWIH) New Delhi.


www.dwih.in



Monday, October 16, 2017

Call for Papers in Journal "DIALOGUE: Science, Scientists, and Society"

DIALOGUE: Science, Scientists, and Society 
to be published from January 2018
Published by the Indian Academy of Sciences

Aim and Scope
DIALOGUE: Science, Scientists, and Society, published by the Indian Academy of Sciences, Bengaluru, provides a scholarly forum for scientists and other interested parties to discuss and debate issues pertaining to science and society, in the broadest sense. The journal covers three related but distinct themes: (a) the practice of science, including choice of problem, publication, evaluation, funding and other matters; (b) communication of science by its practitioners to students, politicians, administrators, other interested parties, and the general public; and (c) the impact of science on society, and vice versa. These themes are envisaged to cover, for example, introspection on practices in science and academia, education and the communication of science, gender and allied issues in science, science as a social system, culture of science, future directions and implications, goals of science, science-social science interfaces (conversations across disciplines and knowledge systems), indigenous and local knowledge systems and science, imaginations driven by science, connections with other countries, global contributions, funding, organisation of science, administration and management of science, evaluation, critical studies of science and society, science policy studies and more. The journal is also a place for discussion on planning scientific policy, as well as issues pertaining to science education and policy towards education. The journal aims to foster discussion and dialogue by publishing papers addressing any aspect of science practice, science teaching, science administration, science policy and the science-society interface. It will also serve as a place to put on record archival documents from the past, as well as those that may be produced in the future, in which the Academy or other such bodies put down in writing the results of their deliberations on issues of relevance to scientists and society. The journal is accompanied by a more informal but moderated web platform, Confluence that aims to provide a forum for all interested parties to share and debate views and interact on these crucial issues.

DIALOGUE: Science, Scientists, and Society considers articles on all issues pertaining to science practice, science policy, science education, science administration, science communication, and the science-society interface. Contributions must be scholarly in nature and balanced in their outlook. Polemic is not encouraged. Author(s) are responsible for the views expressed in published articles, and publication of an article does not imply an endorsement of the views or opinions therein by the Indian Academy of Sciences. All contributions, including invited submissions, undergo editorial and peer review. The journal is online only: there is no print edition and no restriction on use of colour illustrations. Supporting multimedia material is permitted. PDF and HTML files of all published articles are downloadable free of charge from the journal website. All articles must be in English, with British spelling.

Categories of Manuscript
DIALOGUE: Science, Scientists, and Society will consider full-length articles, short notes, and commentaries. Review articles, annotated bibliography pieces, and book, website or software reviews will typically be solicited. Prospective authors of such contributions are encouraged to contact the editors with a brief proposal prior to submission. There are word limits for all categories.
  • Article: The regular full-length article (maximum 10,000 words, main text), reporting results of original research or surveys, or an essay pertaining to science and social issues that includes data components, with an abstract of about 250 words.
  • Short note: A brief article (maximum 2500 words, main text; no abstract; up to four figures, tables, or other display items (e.g. videos); up to 20 references) on an interesting issue but not as fully developed as a full-length article. The first paragraph should be in the form of a summary of the note in about 150 words.
  • Commentary: A brief summary (maximum 3000 words, main text; up to two display items; up to 20 references) of recently published article(s) in other journals on a common theme of general interest, placing the work discussed in a broader context; no abstract.
  • Correspondence: A brief comment/critique on an article recently published in DIALOGUE: Science, Scientists, and Society (maximum 2500 words, main text; up to three display items; up to 20 references); no abstract. Authors of the original paper will be invited to submit a response.
  • Review article: No word / reference / display item limit; should include an abstract of less than 300 words.
  • Perspectives: A general article looking at some major issue in science research or education, technological applications of science, or the history of science and its impact on society; no word / reference / display item limit; should include abstract of less than 300 words.
  • Book/software/website review: No word limit; no abstract.

Policy on plagiarism
Plagiarism as a form of scientific misconduct has been on the rise in recent times. Defined by the US Office of Research Integrity as "the appropriation of another person's ideas, processes, results or words without giving appropriate credit", the increase in plagiarism is due not only to all too human failings, but also to the ease with which the emergence of the Internet has made such misconduct possible. Compared to earlier generations, training of students today seems to have become slack in the sense of not conveying a clear understanding of what is right and what is not in such matters.
The editors of all the journals of the Indian Academy of Sciences take a very serious view of any evidence of plagiarism including self-plagiarism in manuscripts submitted to them. Every reasonable effort will be made to investigate any allegations of plagiarism brought to their attention, as well as instances that come up during the peer review process. Such behaviour when proven beyond doubt is unacceptable, and will be suitably exposed. Self-plagiarism will be treated just as seriously. claimed new results express the author's own findings, and all material taken from the existing literature has been properly acknowledged and referenced.
Upon receipt of a manuscript by any of the Academy journals, the authors or corresponding author will be required to sign an undertaking to the effect that the work has not been submitted elsewhere for publication, the claimed new results express the author's own findings, and all material taken from the existing literature has been properly acknowledged and referenced.
In those instances where in spite of these precautions a case of plagiarism goes undetected in the review process and is discovered after publication, both online and print versions of the journals concerned will carry a notice of the discovery. Depending on the seriousness of the case, the Academy reserves the right to inform the heads of the offending authors' institutions and their funding agencies about the editors' findings.
The jurisdiction for all disputes concerning published material, subscription and sale will be at courts/tribunals situated in Bengaluru city only.

CfP: International Conference on Econophys-2017 & Asia Pacific Econophysics Conference (APEC)-2017

International Conference on Econophys 2017 & Asia Pacific Econophysics Conference (APEC) 2017 
November 15-18, 2017
at Jawaharlal Nehru University / Delhi University, New Delhi, India

About the Conference
Welcome to the International conference on Econophysics & Sociophysics. Economic and financial markets appear to be in a permanent state of flux. Billions of agents interact with each other, giving rise to complex dynamics of economic quantities at the micro and macro level. With the availability of huge data sets, researchers can address questions at a much more granular level than was possible earlier. Fundamental questions of aggregation of actions and information, coordination, evolution of economic and financial networks have received significant importance in the current research agenda of the Econophysics literature, Parallely, Sociophysics literature has focused on large-scale social data and their inter-relations. The proposed empirical approach is a leading contender to find patterns in data, which can be very short-lived. In this meeting, we focus on questions and models to analyze such economic and social behavior.


Friday, October 13, 2017

New Book | National Industrial Policy of India: New Initiatives of the Government, Public Policy & Governance in India | by Dr Pawan Sikka

New Book

National Industrial Policy of India: New Initiatives of the Government, Public Policy & Governance in India
by Pawan Sikka, 2017, Synergy Books India, ISBN 9789382059660. 

About the Book
National policies, strategies and promotional measures adopted earlier in the 20th century by the Government, since the last industrial policy was enacted in 1991, for the industrial growth in India cannot now deliver the meaningful results, import and export targets, economic growth parameters, etc. in the 21st century. The introduction of ICT (information and communication technology) as well as the new initiatives of the Government, i.e., Make in India, Skill India, Start-Ups, Digital India, etc. besides the enactment of Goods and Service Tax (GST) Bill 2016/17 have further enhanced desires of meeting the rising expectations and challenges of the domestic and foreign markets of "Make in India" products. 
A need has been emphasized in this book "National Industrial Policy of India: New Initiatives of the Government, Public Policy & Governance in India", for the early formulation and enactment of a new National Industrial Policy, say in 2017, with a forward looking approach, towards catching-up of the new and emerging scenarios of the industrial developments in India and abroad in the millennium.

About the Author
Dr. Pawan Sikka (b. 1944) is a former Scientist-G/ Adviser, Government of India, Ministry/Department of Science and Technology, New Delhi, where he served in various senior positions, during 1974-2004. He received his M.Sc., PhD as well as D.Sc. degrees in Physics and Fellowship (Science Policy Studies), University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. He is also a recipient of UNESCO, Italian, German and Swiss government scholarships for pursuing further studies there. He is best known for his contributions to Science Policy studies, in India and abroad. He is a life member of the Semiconductor Society of India, Materials Research Society of India, Association of British Scholars, and Oxford and Cambridge Society of India.

Invitation to Register: Join UNESCO for the Dean's Conference on Quality Standards (23-24 Nov 2017, Bangkok)

Dear Colleagues,

 

UNESCO Bangkok is pleased to announce that it will host the upcoming Dean's Conference on Quality Standards: How to Develop Subject Benchmarks for Quality Higher Education (23-24 November in Bangkok, Thailand). In collaboration with UNESCO, invited guests and researchers can help take stock of diverse needs and shape the development of quality standards in Asia-Pacific (Concept Note attached). To ensure active participation in this research and development effort, you are invited to register online.

 

Requests to attend the meeting will be reviewed through 1 November 2017. Limited funding is available on a case-by-case basis, which can be requested in the link below. Due to limited space, please wait for final confirmation of acceptance.

 

We hope to see you soon in Bangkok!

 

Section for Educational Innovation and Skills Development (EISD)

UNESCO Bangkok

--

 

 

Register online by 1 November 2017 or email questions to Ms. Jihye Hwang (j.hwang@unesco.org)

Thursday, October 12, 2017

UNESCO Publishing issues first ever manual on desalination and harmful algal blooms

UNESCO Press Release No.2017-112

UNESCO Publishing issues first ever manual on desalination and harmful algal blooms

Paris, 12 October—UNESCO's Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission will launch the first ever guidebook on the growing problem harmful algal blooms pose to seawater desalination plants on 16 October.  The launch will take place at the International Desalination Association World Congress in São Paulo Brazil.

Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) and Desalination: A Guide to Impacts, Monitoring, and Management is published to help the desalination industry tackle an issue that represents a potential threat both to human health and to the distribution of desalinated water on which an increasing number of arid countries rely for their fresh water needs.

In eleven chapters, the manual covers multiple topics including twelve cases studies that contains practical information for desalination plant designers and operators.  Other chapters address fundamental features of algal blooms, species identification, HAB ecology, toxins, biomass, and extracellular products. It also discusses ways to maintain plant operations when challenged by an increase in suspended solids and organic loads associated with HABs.

A chapter in the manual furthermore describes risk assessment frameworks and approaches to secure safe drinking water in the face of a toxic marine HAB, along with an HAB Management Response Plan. 

The 517-page manual is a groundbreaking achievement built on the cooperation of 63 HAB and desalination industry specialists from multiple disciplines, some of which had rarely interacted in the past.  The publication was sponsored by the Middle East Desalination Research Center (MEDRC), the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and UNESCO's Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC). It was edited by Don Anderson, Siobhan Boerlage and Mike Dixon.

****

Copies of the manual can be ordered online at http://www.ioc-unesco.org/HAB-desalination

Media Contact: Agnès Bardon, UNESCO Press Service, a.bardon@unesco.org +33(0)145681764



If you would rather not receive future communications from UNESCO, let us know by clicking here.
UNESCO, 7, place de Fontenoy, PARIS, NA FRANCE France

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

NPC New Delhi invites applications for e-Learning Course on Green Productivity from 13-16 November, 2017

 

National Productivity Council

Utpadakta Bhawan

5-6 Institutional Area

Lodhi Road

New Delhi – 110 003

Tel. 011-24607328

Fax: 011-24615002

No. 31130/17

 


Sub:       17-IN-68-GE-DLN-B: e-Learning Course on Green Productivity from 13-16 November, 2017, New Delhi, India. (Visit www.npcindia.gov.in/5280-2/ for detailed Project Notification)

 

Dear Sir/ Madam,

 

We invite your kind attention to internet link on NPC website www.npcindia.gov.in/5280-2/  with regard to above project.  The project notification and the bio data form are available on the above mentioned page and the same are attached herewith. The duly filled in single copy of Performa enclosed o the sutiable officers for participation as per the para (Qualifications for Participants) of the project notification may kindly be forwarded to reach us latest by 30th October, 2017.  All nominations should be routed through proper channel.  The nominations received after the last date will not be considered.  You are rquested to send nominations by e-mail (application in pdf format) and hard copy by post.  All information pertaining to nominations will be treated as confidential and classified.

 

It is the responsibility of the candidates to complete all the official formalities required by their organizations/department. The nomination form may be accompanied by a draft of Rs. 1500/- + S.T. (NON-REFUNDABLE) drawn in favour of National Productivity Council, New Delhi (Rs. 800/-+ S.T. for MSME Sector, trade unions and NGO's) for each participant.  In the absence of application fee and single copy of bio-data, the nominations will not be considered. 

 

 

Thanking you,

 

 

Yours faithfully,

 

 

 

(K D Bhardwaj)

Director & Head (Int'l Services)

for Director General

e-mail: isg@npcindia.gov.in

 

Application Form

Sunday, October 8, 2017

CSSP Talk on 11th October | Data Privacy, Security, Confidentiality and the ‘Cloud': Regulating Cyberspace | Rodney D. Ryder

Centre for Studies in Science Policy

School of Social Sciences, JNU

Invites you to

Talk on

Data Privacy, Security, Confidentiality and the 'Cloud': Regulating Cyberspace – Version 2.0

by

Rodney D. Ryder

Practicing Lawyer

Venue: Room No. 227, 2nd Floor, SSS-1

Time: 11:30 a.m.

Date: Wednesday, 11th October 2017

Abstract: Privacy and Data Protection are critical issues in this new online world. With the advent of new technologies, it has become easier to collect sensitive personal information of an individual. It is the duty of the collector of such sensitive information to protect it at all times from unauthorised access and use by third parties. The session will focus on prevalent issues and challenges related to information security, privacy and data protection. Existing regulatory mechanisms such as the Information Technology Act, 2000 in India, the European Union General Data Protection Regulation and other such legislations will also be discussed in the context of cloud computing, cross border data sharing, confidentiality, trade secrets, etc. The session will primarily focus on the following: Internet Law and Policy: Information Security and Data Transfer; Indian Information Technology Act, 2000; Cloud Computing; Cross Border Data Sharing; Confidentiality, Trade Secrets and Privacy; Data Privacy and Information Security [Challenges and Strategies]; Data Protection Legislations around the world.

About the Speaker: Rodney D. Ryder is a lawyer with two decades of experience in technology, intellectual property and new media laws. He is a partner with Scriboard, a full service commercial law firm with cutting edge specialisation in technology, new media and intellectual property laws. He is the author of Guide to Cyber Laws: the Information Technology Act, 2000, E-Commerce, Data Protection and the Internet, the first section-wise analysis of the Indian Information Technology Act, 2000. He is presently Advisor to the Ministry of Communications and Information Technology, Government of India on the implementation of the Information Technology Act, 2000. He has been nominated as a 'Leading Lawyer' in intellectual property, technology, communications and media law by Asia Law, Who'sWhoLegal, Asia Legal 500, amongst other International publications. Mr. Ryder has been listed as one of India's leading lawyers in the '40 under 45' study conducted by WhosWhoLegal, United Kingdom. His second book, Intellectual Property and the Internet [published by LexisNexis] has been acknowledged to be an authoritative work on domain name disputes by the Hon'ble Supreme Court of India and has been quoted in the first and only judgement by the Hon'ble Supreme Court of India on domain names [Satyam Infoway Ltd. v. Sifynet Solutions Pvt. Ltd.; (2004) 6 SCC 145]. He is advisor to the National Internet Exchange of India [NIXI] and a member of the panel of independent and neutral arbitrators with NIXI.

 

All are welcome to attend the lecture.

Coordinator, CSSP Lecture Series

Call for Applications: STEPS Summer School on Pathways to Sustainability | 14-25 May 2018, at IDS, U.K.

STEPS Summer School on Pathways to Sustainability
14-25 May 2018, United Kingdom

Applications are invited for the next annual STEPS Summer School on Pathways to Sustainability on 14-25 May 2018.

APPLY
Application is via an online form. The deadline is 5 pm GMT on Sunday 28 January 2018


ABOUT THE SUMMER SCHOOL
The Summer School brings together highly-motivated doctoral and postdoctoral researchers, working in fields around development studies, science and technology studies, innovation and policy studies, and across agricultural, health, urban, water or energy issues. The aim is to explore theories, ideas, research methods and practical applications of STEPS thinking on pathways to sustainability.
The venue is the Institute of Development Studies at the University of Sussex, near Brighton, UK. Through a mix of lectures, walks, discussions and public events, participants challenge the STEPS team and each other on questions of science, society and development. The school has run since 2012 with the generous support of the ESRC, IDRC and UKIERI. The fee is £1000 GBP – some scholarships are available.

Download the Brochure: STEPS Summer School 2018 (PDF)

TESTIMONIALS
STEPS Summer school 2017 testimonials
  • "A great way to expand your network as a PhD student and find like-minded people who I hope to keep in touch with and work with the future." 2017 participant
  • "I can honestly say it has been the best 2 weeks of the PhD so far. To be in such an amazing, supportive and inspiring group has been fantastic" 2016 participant
  • "Wonderful opportunity. A fantastic group of participants, and the very knowledgable faculty treated us as colleagues on this journey towards sustainable pathways together." 2014 participant
  • "Beautiful to have 24 nations in the same room thinking and discussing global to local issues!" 2013 participant
  • "I liked the fact that it really was an open space in which everyone's (teachers AND students) ideas and experiences could be shared and critically engaged with."  2012 participant
HOW IT WORKS
The Institute of Development Studies (IDS) is the main venue. IDS is on the edge of the Sussex University campus, set in the middle of rolling countryside but with good transport links to Brighton. The programme includes lectures and discussions, 'walkshops' – longer discussions held on walks through the surrounding area – and social events. The Summer School also includes some time in smaller groups, where participants get to reflect and discuss their own work, led and mentored by members of the STEPS Centre. The discussion in these groups goes towards a mini-conference, planned and run by participants themselves, with support from the STEPS team.

Friday, October 6, 2017

World Teachers’ Day (5 October 2017)

Dear Colleagues,

 

Below, we are pleased to share a joint message from UNESCO, ILO, UNICEF, UNDP and Education International for World Teachers' Day 2017.

 

With a special focus on higher education, this message explores: Teaching in Freedom, Empowering Teachers.

 

Please also follow our online discussion and social media feeds – please help spread the word.

 

With our warm regards on this special day,

 

Section for Educational Innovation and Skills Development (EISD)
UNESCO Bangkok

 

Like our UNESCO Asia-Pacific Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/unescobkk

 

From: ODG
Sent: Wednesday, October 4, 2017 14:38
Subject: Joint Message by UNESCO, ILO, UNICEF, UNDP and Education International on 5-10-17: World Teachers' Day / Journée mondiale des enseignants

 

JOINT MESSAGE

English / Français

 

by Irina Bokova, UNESCO Director-General; Guy Ryder, ILO Director-General; Anthony Lake, UNICEF Executive Director; Achim Steiner, UNDP Administrator; and Fred van Leeuwen, General Secretary of Education International.

 

 

 

 

Message from the Heads of UNESCO, ILO, UNICEF, UNDP and Education International on the occasion of World Teachers' Day, 5 October 2017

 

Teaching in Freedom, Empowering Teachers

 

Teachers are a critical foundation of every society's long-term strength -- providing children, young people and adults with the knowledge and skills they need to fulfill their potential.

But around the world, far too many teachers don't have the freedom and support they need to do their vitally important jobs. That is why the theme of this year's World Teachers' Day – "Teaching in Freedom, Empowering Teachers" – reaffirms the value of empowered teachers and recognizes the challenges many encounter in their professional lives across the globe.

Being an empowered teacher means having access to high-quality training, fair wages, and continuous opportunities for professional development. It also means having the freedom to support the development of national curricula -- and the professional autonomy to choose the most appropriate methods and approaches that enable more effective, inclusive and equitable education. Furthermore, it means being able to teach in safety and security during times of political change, instability, and conflict. 

But in many countries, academic freedom and teacher autonomy are under pressure. For example, at the primary and secondary school levels in some countries, stringent accountability schemes have put enormous pressure on schools to deliver results on standardized tests, ignoring the need to ensure a broad-based curriculum that meets the diverse needs of students.

Academic freedom is critical for teachers at every level of education, but it is especially critical for higher-education teachers, supporting their ability to innovate, explore, and stay up-to-date on the latest pedagogical research. At the tertiary level, teachers are often employed on a fixed-term, contingency basis. This in turn can result in greater job insecurity, diminished career prospects, higher workload and lower wages – all of which can restrict academic freedom and undermine the quality of education that teachers can deliver. 

Across all education levels, political pressure and business interests can curb the ability of educators to teach in freedom. Teachers living and working in countries and communities affected by conflicts and instability often face greater challenges, including rising intolerance, discrimination, and related restrictions on research and teaching.

This year marks the 20 year anniversary of the 1997 UNESCO Recommendation concerning the Status of Higher-Education Teaching Personnel, which complements the 1966 UNESCO/ILO Recommendation concerning the Status of Teachers. Together, these instruments constitute the main reference framework on the rights and responsibilities of teachers and educators. Both stress the importance of teacher autonomy and academic freedom in building a world in which education and learning are truly universal.

As the world works together to realize the vision of the Sustainable Development Goals, we appeal to our partners in governments and across the education and private sectors to commit to building a highly skilled, valued and empowered education workforce. This constitutes a critical path to realizing SDG 4, which envisions a world in which every girl, boy, woman and man has access to quality education and lifelong learning opportunities.

This means securing decent working conditions and fair wages for all teachers including at the tertiary level. It means providing teachers with training and development. It means increasing the number of quality teachers, especially in those countries with high numbers of untrained teaching personnel. It means removing unnecessary restrictions on research and teaching and defending academic freedom at all education levels. Finally, it means raising the status of teachers around the world in a way that honors and reflects the impact they have on the strength of society.

This World Teachers' Day, join us in empowering teachers to teach in freedom so that, in turn, every child and every adult is free to learn – to the benefit of a better world.

- - -


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


UNESCO
7, Place de Fontenoy
75007 Paris
France

 

Website:

www.unesco.org/new/en/ unesco/about-us/who-we-are/director-general/

 

Thursday, October 5, 2017

[apeid.higher_education.bgk] World Teachers’ Day (5 October 2017)

Dear Colleagues,

 

Below, we are pleased to share a joint message from UNESCO, ILO, UNICEF, UNDP and Education International for World Teachers' Day 2017.

 

With a special focus on higher education, this message explores: Teaching in Freedom, Empowering Teachers.

 

Please also follow our online discussion and social media feeds – please help spread the word.

 

With our warm regards on this special day,

 

Section for Educational Innovation and Skills Development (EISD)
UNESCO Bangkok

 

Like our UNESCO Asia-Pacific Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/unescobkk

 

 

unesco_logo_multi_flash

JOINT MESSAGE



by Irina Bokova, UNESCO Director-General; Guy Ryder, ILO Director-General; Anthony Lake, UNICEF Executive Director; Achim Steiner, UNDP Administrator; and Fred van Leeuwen, General Secretary of Education International.

 

 

http://vivariumnovum.net/unesco/UNESCO.jpghttp://apirnet.ilo.org/news/ilo-ilo-director-general2019s-statement-on-trade-union-developments-in-fiji/imageUNICEF_logo_Cyan (2) (2)http://www.orbitone.com/SiteCollectionImages/Project%20Logos/Large/eilogo-big.gifhttp://sites.duke.edu/tlge/files/2010/04/UNDP_Logo.gif

 

 

Message from the Heads of UNESCO, ILO, UNICEF, UNDP and Education International on the occasion of World Teachers' Day, 5 October 2017

 

Teaching in Freedom, Empowering Teachers

 

Teachers are a critical foundation of every society's long-term strength -- providing children, young people and adults with the knowledge and skills they need to fulfill their potential.

But around the world, far too many teachers don't have the freedom and support they need to do their vitally important jobs. That is why the theme of this year's World Teachers' Day – "Teaching in Freedom, Empowering Teachers" – reaffirms the value of empowered teachers and recognizes the challenges many encounter in their professional lives across the globe.

Being an empowered teacher means having access to high-quality training, fair wages, and continuous opportunities for professional development. It also means having the freedom to support the development of national curricula -- and the professional autonomy to choose the most appropriate methods and approaches that enable more effective, inclusive and equitable education. Furthermore, it means being able to teach in safety and security during times of political change, instability, and conflict. 

But in many countries, academic freedom and teacher autonomy are under pressure. For example, at the primary and secondary school levels in some countries, stringent accountability schemes have put enormous pressure on schools to deliver results on standardized tests, ignoring the need to ensure a broad-based curriculum that meets the diverse needs of students.

Academic freedom is critical for teachers at every level of education, but it is especially critical for higher-education teachers, supporting their ability to innovate, explore, and stay up-to-date on the latest pedagogical research. At the tertiary level, teachers are often employed on a fixed-term, contingency basis. This in turn can result in greater job insecurity, diminished career prospects, higher workload and lower wages – all of which can restrict academic freedom and undermine the quality of education that teachers can deliver. 

Across all education levels, political pressure and business interests can curb the ability of educators to teach in freedom. Teachers living and working in countries and communities affected by conflicts and instability often face greater challenges, including rising intolerance, discrimination, and related restrictions on research and teaching.

This year marks the 20 year anniversary of the 1997 UNESCO Recommendation concerning the Status of Higher-Education Teaching Personnel, which complements the 1966 UNESCO/ILO Recommendation concerning the Status of Teachers. Together, these instruments constitute the main reference framework on the rights and responsibilities of teachers and educators. Both stress the importance of teacher autonomy and academic freedom in building a world in which education and learning are truly universal.

As the world works together to realize the vision of the Sustainable Development Goals, we appeal to our partners in governments and across the education and private sectors to commit to building a highly skilled, valued and empowered education workforce. This constitutes a critical path to realizing SDG 4, which envisions a world in which every girl, boy, woman and man has access to quality education and lifelong learning opportunities.

This means securing decent working conditions and fair wages for all teachers including at the tertiary level. It means providing teachers with training and development. It means increasing the number of quality teachers, especially in those countries with high numbers of untrained teaching personnel. It means removing unnecessary restrictions on research and teaching and defending academic freedom at all education levels. Finally, it means raising the status of teachers around the world in a way that honors and reflects the impact they have on the strength of society.

This World Teachers' Day, join us in empowering teachers to teach in freedom so that, in turn, every child and every adult is free to learn – to the benefit of a better world.

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UNESCO
7, Place de Fontenoy
75007 Paris
France

 

Website:

www.unesco.org/new/en/ unesco/about-us/who-we-are/director-general/