Monday, August 3, 2015

IE OpEd "A Department of State: The modern Indian university has always been yoked to the state project of the moment" by Niraja Gopal Jayal

A Department of State: The modern Indian university has always been yoked to the state project of the moment.
by Niraja Gopal Jayal | July 27, 2015, Indian Express

In the end, what we have is a highly uneven and differentiated university system in which there is little reflection and no consensus on what a university is for.

The fundamental disagreement in the clash of the titans, Amartya Sen and Pratap Bhanu Mehta, appears to centre on the question of whether political interference in universities today is more egregious than in the past. Mehta claims that there is nothing unprecedented about this, "even in its scope or scale," and Sen responds with impeccable logic that that does not make it acceptable. It could nevertheless be argued that Nalanda — with its short history tainted by allegations not all of which have been convincingly refuted — is scarcely the most alarming example of all the attempts, past and present, to control academic institutions.
Both Sen and Mehta seem to share the somewhat optimistic assumption that academic institutions in this country once were or could potentially be autonomous entities that are constitutively free of governmental and/ or partisan political control. Neither acknowledges the black hole at the heart of any debate about higher education in India, a fact that has to do with the very nature of the beast itself: that the modern Indian university has, from colonial times to the present day, been viewed as properly yoked to the state project of the moment.
Every major commission on education in India over the last 60 years — from the S. Radhakrishnan Commission to the National Knowledge Commission — has sought to harness universities to state projects of, variously, constitutional values, nation-building, development and the creation of a 21st century knowledge society. It is only the particular state project to which universities were hitched that has changed from time to time, not the fact of such a harness, much less the legitimacy attached to it.
Partisan politics of one sort or another has undoubtedly made this worse, but this is at best an exploitation of the opportunities provided by structural weaknesses in university governance. Fundamentally, universities are not, and have never been, autonomous. Even as we recognise that public funding is incontrovertibly essential for higher education, we neither have institutional mechanisms for securing public accountability while safeguarding university autonomy, nor an archive of past institutional practices of this kind available for retrieval. To confine governmental power to domains of university functioning in which it is appropriate, and to resist its relentless encroachments into domains in which it is not, calls for serious reflection on how to strike this balance.
The Napoleonic model of the university as a department of state, with faculty treated as (lesser) civil servants, has long thrived in India. Centralisation and bureaucratisation have serious implications — curricular and pedagogical — for universities. Indeed, a major concern of the university community today is the clumsy attempt, initiated by the last government and being energetically promoted today, to standardise the curricula of the central universities, ostensibly to give students more choice.
Ironically, this so-called choice entails the sacrifice of diversity and greater control through homogenisation. This is certainly among the most serious challenges facing universities today, along with the stifling of dissent, the packing of leadership positions with individuals whose calling card is loyalty rather than academic credentials, and the pathetic attempts to infiltrate the intellectual life of the academy armed with faith and myth rather than objective standards of scientific achievement.
It could be argued that there is, in any case, little scope for autonomy in academic institutions whose primary function has, since colonial times, been seen as the transmission of knowledge and the certification that such knowledge has been duly transmitted. The Indian university has increasingly and exclusively become a source of credentialisation for a society in which certification matters more than what is learned. Two current obsessions — that of fake degrees and of 100 per cent marks in school-leaving examinations — are poignant symbols of this.
The view that the purpose of the university is to transmit knowledge rather than to produce it led, in the early years after Independence, to the creation of standalone institutions for research, in the social sciences and even more in science and technology. The accomplishments of some of these institutions were surely impressive, but an unintended consequence was the arrangement of research and teaching in a hierarchy that privileged researchers, or the producers of knowledge, over teachers as its transmitters. The introduction of research and publications as a formal requirement for recruitment and advancement in universities is a relatively recent phenomenon that has, in both design and implementation, ill-served the objective.
In the states, where the bulk of Indian universities are located, talk of nepotism, cronyism, and even corruption in appointments — from lectureships to vice-chancellorships — is commonplace. In the "elite" Central universities, many conform to the Napoleonic model fortified by the self-conscious virtue that comes with association with the higher purposes of state, and sometimes also the power and that results from such association. Others live out the fantasy of a Humboldtian community of scholars engaged in the pursuit of knowledge for its own sake. This wishful imagination may be the source of elitist islands of scholarly excellence, but let us not forget that it inhabits a meta-institutional hyper-reality.
In the end, what we have is a highly uneven and differentiated university system in which there is little reflection and no consensus on what a university is for. Even the arriviste private liberal arts college has come to us from the United States and not from the British Isles where Cardinal Newman articulated the vision centuries ago. But colonialism did not give us universities modelled on Dublin or Oxford. It gave us institutions modelled on the University of London, essentially affiliating institutions formulating syllabi and conducting examinations.
To entertain greater expectations of the mass of Indian universities is to be deluded, because this is and has always been their purpose: to transmit received knowledge, conduct examinations and award degrees, all of these functions performed by state personnel called faculty under the watchful eye of a micro-governing state.

Jayal, professor at the Centre for the Study of Law and Governance, Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi, is writing a book on the death of the public university in India.


- See more at: http://indianexpress.com/article/opinion/columns/a-department-of-state/

Listen to 1st KR Narayanan Memorial Lecture on "Child Labour: A Human Rights Violation & An Impediment in Economic Growth" delivered by Kailash Satyarthi

First Dr. K. R. Narayanan Memorial Lecture

on

"Child Labour: A Human Rights Violation and An Impediment in Economic Growth"

delivered by
Sh. Kailash Satyarthi
Recipient of Nobel Peace Prize & Human Rights Activist

on Monday, 3 August, 2015

JNU Convention Centre, New Delhi, India

Listen to the Lecture


IE "New Atomic Regulator: Nuking the Autonomy Red Flag"

New Atomic Regulator: Nuking the Autonomy Red Flag
by Anil Sasi | July 29, 2015 Indian Express

IAEA had, in March, flagged the need for an independent statutory regulator and delinking of AERB from the rest of the country's nuclear establishment.

Marking a renewed effort to bolster India's nuclear regulatory mechanism, the NDA government is in advanced stages of readying a new legislation — the Nuclear Safety Regulatory Authority Bill, 2015. The Bill, prepared after a fresh round of inter-ministerial consultations and expected to be re-introduced in Parliament after the completion of necessary pre-legislative formalities, is seen as a crucial step towards converting the functional independence of the country's atomic regulator into a 'de jure' independence with statutory backing.
The move to reintroduce the legislation comes at a time when the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) had, after a 12-day review of Indian nuclear regulatory establishment in March this year, strongly flagged the need for an independent statutory atomic regulator in India and the delinking of the regulator — the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) — from the rest of the country's nuclear establishment. The UPA government had introduced the Nuclear Safety Regulatory Authority (NSRA) Bill, 2011, in the Lok Sabha on September 7, 2011, but the Bill could not be taken up for consideration due to dissolution of Fifteenth Lok Sabha.
Currently, the AERB, established in 1983 through a gazette notification, is entrusted with the task of regulating the safety aspects of the country's civilian nuclear facilities and overseeing the opening up of a civil nuclear market that has an estimated business potential of $60-100 billion.
The way things stand currently, the AERB lacks autonomy as it has to report to the Atomic Energy Commission. "By enacting NSRA Act, the functional independence of AERB will be converted into de jure independence. With the formation of the 16th Lok Sabha, the new Bill is at an advanced stage of processing for reintroduction after a fresh round of inter-ministerial consultations," an official involved in the exercise said.
The demand for establishing a truly autonomous nuclear regulator has been hanging fire for some time. In 1997, the Raja Ramanna Committee report had recommended that the Atomic Energy Act (1962) should be amended to bolster the effectiveness of the nuclear regulatory mechanism in the country. Subsequently, in the year 2000, even though the Union government had directed the Department of Atomic Energy to suggest the necessary amendments to the 1962 Act, not much happened for nearly a decade. A combination of the Mayapuri radiation accident in Delhi in 2010 and the Fukushima disaster in Japan a year later forced a rethink on the need for a strong regulatory establishment. In 2011, the NSRA Bill was drafted by the DAE and submitted to the Union Cabinet for approval and introduced in the Lok Sabha in September that year.
The lack of functional autonomy of the Indian nuclear regulator has been flagged as a concern, both by global nuclear vendors and the international atomic sector watchdog.
The IAEA was categorical in its assertion that while India had a "strong commitment to safety," the AERB needed more independence and separation from the government.
The IAEA's review report submitted after completing its 12-day review of India's nuclear safety standards in March, which was done at the request of AERB and included interviews and discussions with regulatory staff and site visits. The review, which coincided with the IAEA's Director General Yukiya Amano visiting Mumbai, Delhi and Rajasthan, also flagged the need for the Indian government to allow more on-site inspections at the nuclear power plants under international safeguards.
According to a release from the IAEA in Vienna, six preliminary suggestions were given at the end of the review which were accepted by the Indian agency.
"The AERB should review the implementation of its policy and existing arrangements to ensure it maintains independence in the performance of its regulatory functions," it said. The chairman of the AERB, SS Bajaj, was quoted as saying, "AERB is committed to pursuing the improvements suggested by the mission towards further strengthening the regulatory framework."
The new NSRA Bill signals India's decision to accord a statutory status to the AERB, which was set up in 1983 through an executive order, and make it completely independent of the Department of Atomic Energy. In its current form, the head of the AERB reports to the Atomic Energy Commission, which incidentally is headed by the Secretary of the Department of Atomic Energy.
The legislative frameworks under which global nuclear regulators such as the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN), the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), and the Nuclear Directorate within the United Kingdom Health & Safety Executive offer near complete functional and operational autonomy for the regulator.
These include the guarantee of their independent statutory status, their mandate to keep the public fully informed on matters of nuclear safety, sharing of joint responsibility to ensure physical security of installations, the authority to penalise offenders who violate the provisions of the act, and the submission of annual reports of their activities to their respective legislatures.
The DAE's official stance has been that the AERB already enjoys functional autonomy and the legislation is only aimed at converting this to a 'de jure' independence.
"The AERB has well established policies governing regulation of nuclear and radiation safety and has all the necessary functional autonomy for conducting the safety reviews and regulatory control of the nuclear and radiation facilities in India. The AERB's functional autonomy and robust policies in regulating nuclear and radiation safety are also evident from the very good safety performance of the nuclear facilities which is on par with the international benchmarks," an official said.
Source: http://indianexpress.com/article/india/india-others/new-atomic-regulator-nuking-the-autonomy-red-flag/

IE OpEd "Open Up the Debate: On Farm Policy, there is an urgent need to listen to farmers, not just economists and academics"

Open Up the Debate: On Farm Policy, there is an urgent need to listen to farmers, not just economists and academics.
by Ajay Vir Jakhar | July 31, 2015  | Indian Express
If one listened to farmers, one would know that they advocate improving the quality of produce, increasing the production of most crops by 20 per cent and, subsequently, increasing farmer profit by simply making available the best farm machinery.

For over two decades, the conversation on farmer issues had languished. Realising the stupor a few years ago, agricultural issues were sought to be made a central topic of discussion in India. Even as the momentum of the debate increased, and understanding was created on the fact that perpetual farm distress had become the horrifying new normal, there was a failure to protect the farmer's turf from academics. This must be acknowledged. Every policymaker has focused on, including in the columns of this paper, policies that tackle food inflation, while we farmers fear and have long argued about ways to counter deflation. This is just one among the many reasons that farmers are at odds with agriculture academicians.
Last year, fearful of inflation, the new government restricted potato exports. I argued against the restrictions ('Making a hash of it', The Indian Express, July 5, 2014) to no avail. This season, potatoes have sold for as low as Rs 2 per kg. When prices fall, the government does a disappearing act. Now, the government has banned the export of onions. Onions, which farmers sold for Rs 6 per kg three months ago, are now retailing for Rs 40 per kg. Food inflation has more to do with issues of hoarding, governance, lack of enforcement of regulation and marketing bottlenecks than production constraints. The future looks bleak for farmers, though achhe din seem to be here for traders. There is absolutely no reason for the government to interfere with the potato and onion markets, where it gives no support price to farmers. Our problem is not too little of the right food but too few policies of the right kind.
Policymakers first aggravated food inflation and are now conveniently propagating the import of food as a way to keep it in check. Economists have pessimistically built their arguments on the assumption that domestic food inflation is here to stay, that it cannot be solved at home. But farmers are optimistic that they can produce enough to feed the nation and are, in fact, threatened by deflation. Different objectives require different approaches. Economists continuously justify and advocate the abolition of farm subsidies in India to save resources, even as we are encouraged to import. In contrast, we farmers suggest reducing subsidies per quintal of production.
If one listened to farmers, one would know that they advocate improving the quality of produce, increasing the production of most crops by 20 per cent and, subsequently, increasing farmer profit by simply making available the best farm machinery. These gains can be realised without any extra seeds, fertiliser, pesticide or water. The small size of holdings don't justify the costs of ownership. Availability of machinery does not mean individual farmers should actually own the machinery, which leads to indebtedness. The Indian government must incentivise leasing as well as permit duty-free imports of better, cheaper farm machinery. There are many more such simple interventions that could have a powerful effect. Like the UPA, if the NDA remains convinced that only academicians possess knowledge and that the opinion of farmers is a burden, we will permanently remain a developing country.
The artificially high international commodity prices fell partly because, in 2013, China banned banks from accepting agriculture commodities as collateral for raising funds. Supply will continue to outpace demand for years to come. This month, the Food and Agriculture Organisation validated our deflation forecast. Presently, many multinational commodity firms are setting up shop in India to purchase grains. But their long-term objective is to use their network for distribution of imported food. Many countries like the United States, Canada, Australia, Brazil and even African nations that grow surplus food have already deduced that India as well as China will be their biggest markets in the future and are positioning themselves to take advantage of this. Their strategies are premised on the conviction that our policymakers will repeatedly fail and that water scarcity will create opportunities they could exploit. To believe that imports are the solution to food shortages and inflation is naive.
In order to reduce water usage, economists suggest reducing the import duty on rice from 70 to 5 per cent. This is far-fetched. They further suggest incentivising farmers to shift from rice to pulses production with a paltry sum of Rs 3,000 per acre. Farmers won't shift to pulses for even three times that sum. For the record, farmers won't shift from paddy to pulses even if the electricity subsidy is withdrawn — though withdrawing this subsidy will definitely result in reduced water usage, if that's the objective. It is common practice for industry associations and international corporate-funded institutions to commission studies, projects and reports to influence policy. But allowing only them to frame farm policy is similar to asking GM seed manufacturers to frame food-labelling guidelines.

The writer is chairman, Bharat Krishak Samaj

Source: http://indianexpress.com/article/opinion/columns/open-up-the-debateon-farm-policy-there-is-an-urgent-need-to-listen-to-farmers-not-just-economists-and-academics/

Friday, July 31, 2015

Audio Recording now available: First Chris Freeman Lecture on "Chris Freeman's Enduring Contribution to the Economics of Innovation" by Prof Mammo Muchie

Research Scholars @ Centre for Studies in Science Policy
School of Social Sciences
Organized

First Chris Freeman Annual Lecture
on
"Chris Freeman's Enduring Contribution to the Economics of Innovation"
By
Professor Mammo Muchie

on Friday, 31st July 2015 at SSS Committee Room, JNU


Thursday, July 30, 2015

ICT for Teacher Development UNESCO Office in Bangkok

The ICT in Education Newsletter, July 2015, is now available. Please feel free to forward it to members of your networks.  To view online, click here.

 

http://www.unescobkk.org/fileadmin/user_upload/ict/ict-newsletter/Banner.jpg

 

ICT for Teacher Development

July 2015 | UNESCO Bangkok Office

 

 

Dear readers,

The Incheon Declaration calls for urgent attention to education that is holistic, inclusive and aspirational, and stresses the significant role of teachers and educators in transforming education and achieving quality lifelong learning for all. This month's newsletter highlights how teachers and educators can be empowered, supported and motivated through and for the use of ICT, ranging from an ICT-supported professional learning network in Canada to a preservice training programme in Singapore to an in-service e-learning programme in Korea.

We hope you enjoy reading this edition!

Please let us know if you have any comments or suggestions.

 

http://www.unescobkk.org/typo3temp/pics/4a6ff44474.jpg© Flickr/cybrarian77

Highlights:


http://www.unescobkk.org/uploads/RTEmagicC_706b0173da_60705e_12.gif.gif Invest in Teachers (by UNESCO Bangkok, APEID/ICT in Education)
This article underlines the importance of investing in teachers, their training, continuous development and support in the backdrop of the global initiatives of providing inclusive, equitable and quality education.

http://www.unescobkk.org/uploads/RTEmagicC_706b0173da_60705e_13.gif.gif Developing Singapore Teachers' Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge for 21st Century Learning (by Prof Ching Sing Chai and Joyce Hwee Ling Koh)
This article provides an overview of the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) for 21st century learning designed to promote teacher ability to develop meaningful classroom activities, underlining the importance of technological, pedagogical and content knowledge.

http://www.unescobkk.org/uploads/RTEmagicC_706b0173da_60705e_13.gif.gif Policies to Promote e-Learning Teacher Training: Korean case (by Dr Jin Sun Yoo)
Written by the KERIS Research Fellow, Jin Sun Yoo, the article shares the Korean approach to e-learning as a mode for teacher training. The author provides the background information of the training program procedures in the country, incentives used to attract more teachers, the benefits of public and private partnerships, as well as some useful recommendations for the interested governments in developing such a policy and programme.

Programmes and Projects:


http://www.unescobkk.org/uploads/RTEmagicC_706b0173da_e67df2_27.gif.gif Central Asia Symposium on ICT in Education 2015 (7-9 July, Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic)
This article provides an overview of the completed CASIE 2015, held in the Kyrgyz Republic, on the theme of "Fostering an Enabling Environment for Teacher Innovation: From Policy to Practice".

http://www.unescobkk.org/uploads/RTEmagicC_706b0173da_e67df2_27.gif.gif Cultivating a Community of Practice for Teacher Professional Development (by Dr. Gyeong Mi Heo)
In this article, Dr. Gyeong Mi focuses on the benefits of Community of Practice (CoP) for teachers, as well as ways to it can be formed. She presents The Creating, Collaborating, and Computing in Mathematics (CCC-M) project as an example, and provides experiential suggestions to facilitating teachers' engagement in a CoP.

http://www.unescobkk.org/uploads/RTEmagicC_706b0173da_e67df2_27.gif.gif UNESCO Resource Distribution and Training Centres (RDTCs)
The goal of this project is to strengthen a network of Teacher Education Institutions (TEIs) in the Asia-Pacific region by developing their capacities in training teachers to use ICT effectively. The Network consists of 24 teacher education institutions in 12 countries in the region who have committed themselves to serve as RDTCs. Annually, UNESCO Bangkok in collaboration with its partners holds a Regional Seminar for UNESCO RDTCs.

http://www.unescobkk.org/uploads/RTEmagicC_706b0173da_e67df2_27.gif.gif Malaysia Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)
The first country in the world to have a single, nation-wide cloud-based learning platform accessible from anywhere with an Internet connection. It aims to help teachers, students and parents. Teachers can manage students' records, create their own teaching resources, provide feedback and communicate with the students, plan their curriculum and more. Students can keep track of their progress, upload and save files, communicate with teachers and classmates. Parents can stay in tune with school events, reports, find the contact information, download forms and more.

News and Events:


http://www.unescobkk.org/uploads/RTEmagicC_706b0173da_732726_22.gif.gif International Conference on Teaching and Learning with Technology (iCTLT 2016). Future Ready: Inspire, Connect, Transform (28-31 March 2016, Singapore)
The biennial conference focuses on advancing 21st century teaching and learning through the use of technologies. The 2016 theme invites participants to share practices, experiences and research on emerging trends in the field of educational technology. 

http://www.unescobkk.org/uploads/RTEmagicC_706b0173da_732726_23.gif.gif Education ICT 2016 (June 2016, London, UK)
This event will bring over 300 teachers, schools leaders and ICT experts to explore the future of technology for learning and curriculum development from across the education sector.

Resources:


http://www.unescobkk.org/uploads/RTEmagicC_706b0173da_e551bc_45.gif.gif UNESCO ICT Competency Framework for Teachers
This free publication developed by UNESCO serves as an international benchmark with the competencies requires to teach effectively through the use of ICT: UNESCO ICT Competency Framework for Teachers (ICT-CFT). As ICT competencies are not enough, teachers need to also be able to equip their students with the necessary skills, which are addresses in the Framework. It consists of three difference approaches to teaching, such as: technology literacy, knowledge deepening, and knowledge creation.

http://www.unescobkk.org/uploads/RTEmagicC_706b0173da_e551bc_46.gif.gif UNESCO Portal for Teachers 
This portal provides ICT in Education information for teachers and educators, particularly in the Asia-Pacific region, such as teaching guidelines, lesson plans, and links to online ICT teacher training courses.

http://www.unescobkk.org/uploads/RTEmagicC_706b0173da_e551bc_47.gif.gif  Intel Education Galaxy
For Russian speaking teachers, this platform focuses on ICT in education: innovative solutions, perspectives and practices. Here, teachers can create and read blog posts, participate in competitions and online conferences, share projects and methodologies, find online resources, and more.

http://www.unescobkk.org/uploads/RTEmagicC_706b0173da_e551bc_48.gif.gif SEAMEO INNOTECH Competency Framework for Southeast Asian School Heads
This Framework aims to provide a benchmark for defining the skills needed for school heads to lead their schools. It consists of 5 domains, more than 50 competencies, and 170 indicators.  

New Publications:


http://www.unescobkk.org/uploads/RTEmagicC_706b0173da_a43db9_28.gif.gif  Millennium Development Goals Report 2015
This UNDESA report provides an analysis and data through the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) to learn from and make decisions for the future development. It also provides the challenges and achievements made throughout this historic effort.

http://www.unescobkk.org/uploads/RTEmagicC_706b0173da_a43db9_29.gif.gif  Progress for Children Beyond Averages: Learning from the MDGs (No. 11)
This UNICEF report on the child-related MDGs presents the data that show the hard lessons learned and provides recommendations for future consideration and attention in regard to the most vulnerable children.

http://www.unescobkk.org/uploads/RTEmagicC_706b0173da_a43db9_30.gif.gif Today's Challenges for Girls' Education
This UNGEI report provides the progress made in girls' education, as well as the remaining challenges and work that need to be done, especially in poorest and disadvantaged contexts. The report also provides recommendations for women's and girls' leadership by focusing on civil society and the private sector.

http://www.unescobkk.org/uploads/RTEmagicC_706b0173da_a43db9_31.gif.gif Education Policy Outlook 2015: Making Reforms Happen
This OECD report is aimed to guide education policy makers in improving their education in a comparative style, taking into consideration the local contexts.

 

Next Issue: The August issue will focus on the theme of ICT for Digital Equity. If our readers are interested in contributing to this edition, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Contact/Feedback: : ict.bgk@unesco.org

ICT in Education website: http://www.unescokk.org/education/ict

View previous newsletters: http://www.unescobkk.org/education/ict/enewsletter      

ICT in Education Fanpage

ICT in Education on Twitter

http://www.unescobkk.org/fileadmin/user_upload/ict/Logos/FB.jpg

http://www.unescobkk.org/fileadmin/user_upload/ict/Logos/Twitter.jpg

 

© UNESCO

For enquiries/feedback, email: ict.bgk@unesco.org
Visit the ICT in Education website: http://www.unescobkk.org/education/ict
View previous newsletters: http://www.unescobkk.org/education/ict/enewsletter/
To unsubscribe from this email newsletter: https://lists.unesco.org/wws/signoff/ict-newsletter.bgk


UNESCO Asia and Pacific Regional Bureau for Education,
920 Sukhumvit Road, Prakanong, Bangkok 10110, Thailand

Disclaimer
The opinions expressed in the documents included in this newsletter are those of the authors and editors and do not necessarily reflect the policies or views of UNESCO, nor of any particular Division or Office. All rights to the resources included in this guide remain with their respective copyright owners, as indicated for each resource.

 

Traveling with Tagore: An Introduction to Tagore's Nationalism, by Ramachandra Guha

Tagore on Swadeshi movement and Gandhi highlight of Ramachandra Guha's talk
Indian Express, July 29, 2015

[Guha's talk focused on Tagore's non-fictional writings and explored the poet's thoughts on three major developments in history. Historian Ramachandra Guha speaks during the Rosalind Wilson Memorial Lecture 2015 at IIC on Tuesday.]

"Tagore travelled mostly out of curiosity. Unlike Gandhi, Nehru or Ambedkar, Tagore was most consciously internationalist" — This insight into poet and Nobel laureate Rabindranath Tagore's life set the tone for historian and biographer Dr Ramachandra Guha's talk at the Rosalind Wilson Memorial Lecture 2015, held at the CD Deshmukh auditorium in the India International Centre on Tuesday.
Titled Between Nationalism and Internationalism: The Political Philosophy of Rabindranath Tagore, the 90-minute lecture began with an introduction to Dr Guha's works by former Attorney-General Soli Sorabjee. "My own discovery of Tagore began with a book called Truth Called Them Differently by R K Prabhu, following which I spent an entire summer reading Tagore's works," Guha said, as he began his lecture.
Guha's talk focused on Tagore's non-fictional writings and explored the poet's thoughts on three major developments in history — the Swadeshi Movement, World War I and Mahatma Gandhi's non-cooperation movement. While elaborating on Tagore's view of the Swadeshi movement, Guha quoted from a rare 1908 letter written by Tagore to a friend — "Patriotism cannot be our final spiritual centre, I will never allow patriotism to triumph over humanity."
The historian went on to explain how Tagore was critical of the developments during the Swadeshi movement, considering them "xenophobic, chauvinistic". "We must glory in the illumination of a lamp anywhere in the world," read out Guha from one of Tagore's early essays on the subject.
Guha spoke in detail about Tagore's "fascination" with Japan. The historian recounted Tagore's trips to Japan and the USA, where he held talks warning the countries against joining the Europeans in war.
"True modernism is freedom of mind not slavery of taste," cited Guha from one of Tagore's lectures to a Japanese audience. Guha also pointed out how Tagore's talks on "true nationalism" were "not so well-received" in America.
But it was the last part of the lecture — where Guha spoke about Tagore's reaction to the non-cooperation movement and his relationship with Mahatma Gandhi — that gripped the audience, which included Congress politicians Shashi Tharoor and Karan Singh, and former BBC bureau chief Mark Tully.
"Tagore had ambivalent feelings about the non-cooperation movement," Guha said.
Guha also quoted extensively from Tagore's letter to his friend C F Andrews, who had acted as an "intermediary between Tagore and Gandhi". Guha stressed on the deep vision in Gandhi's rebuttal to Tagore's criticisms and talked of Gandhi's admiration for the poet despite a disagreement in their beliefs.
- See more at: http://indianexpress.com/article/cities/delhi/tagore-on-swadeshi-movement-and-gandhi-highlight-of-ramachandra-guhas-talk/

Traveling with Tagore: An Introduction to Tagore's Nationalism
By Ramachandra Guha


Download: http://ramachandraguha.in/archives/traveling-with-tagore-penguin-classics.html

Download PDF


Wednesday, July 29, 2015

1st Chris Freeman Lecture on "Chris Freeman's Enduring Contribution to the Economics of Innovation" by Professor Mammo Muchie on Friday, 31st July, at SSS-1 Committee Room

Research Scholars @ Centre for Studies in Science Policy
School of Social Sciences
Organized

First Chris Freeman Annual Lecture
on
"Chris Freeman's Enduring Contribution to the Economics of Innovation"
By
Professor Mammo Muchie

About Professor Chris Freeman
Prof. Christopher Freeman (1921-2010), who died on August 16th aged 88, was a pioneer of the research field known as "innovation studies". He was passionate in his belief that technology and innovation could make the world a better place, and that the "dismal science" of economics could be transformed into "the economics of hope". In 1966 Freeman was invited to set up a Science Policy Research Unit (SPRU) at Sussex University, where, working with Geoffrey Oldham, he quickly built up an impressive array of talented researchers. In 1974 Freeman published The Economics of Industrial Innovation, which was to be the definitive textbook on the subject for the next 30 years. Along with colleagues in SPRU and Germany, Freeman founded the journal Research Policy, editing it for the next 30 years and establishing it as the pre-eminent journal in the field. In 1992 he published The Economics of Hope, and in 2001 he and Francisco Lou├ža brought out As Time Goes By, revisiting and revising his ideas on long-term economic change. In 2003, SPRU moved into a new building, which was named the Freeman Centre in his honour. Freeman was awarded the Bernal Prize and the Schumpeter Prize. (The Telegraph, 7th September 2010).

About the Speaker: Prof. Mammo Muchie is a DST/NRF Research Professor of Innovation Studies at the Institute for Economic Research on Innovation, Tshwane University of Technology, South Africa; and Senior Research Associate at the TMCD Centre, University of Oxford, UK. He completed his doctoral study under the supervision of Prof. Chris Freeman.

Venue:  Committee Room, Ground Floor, SSS-1 Building, JNU
Date:   Friday, 31st July 2015


CfPs: International Conference on Development-Induced Displacement and Migration, Land Acquisition & Resettlement; CDS, Kerala, 3-4 March

IDRC sponsored International Conference on Development-Induced Displacement and Migration, Land Acquisition and Resettlement
3-4 March 2016
Venue: Centre for Development Studies (CDS), Thiruvanathapuram, Kerala, India

The CDS invites papers for an international conference on Development-induced Displacement and Migration, Land Acquisition and Resettlement to be held in Thiruvananthapuram during 3-4 March 2016. The aim of the conference is to provide a platform to academics, development practitioners and research scholars studying development-induced displacement to critically discuss, refl ect and disseminate research on various topics on or related to the theme. In various contexts and across regions, development projects have displaced urban, rural, indigenous and tribal populations from their lands without effectively addressing the adverse impacts to their livelihood. This seminar is also organized to disseminate the findings of the ongoing IDRC project on Involuntary Resettlement: A Cross-country Study on Urban Inequality and Poverty.

Case-studies as well as papers with a focus on resettlement and proposed changes to the land acquisition policy and its consequences are welcome. Papers facilitating a dialogue between disciplines and perspectives are encouraged.

Submissions using different analytical methods such as quantitative and qualitative empirical methods, mixed methods, historical and theoretical analyses are also welcome.

Deadline (Abstracts): 15 October 2015.

Abstracts may be sent to: displacementseminar@gmail.com

A committee will evaluate the abstract and give priority to originality, analytical rigour and policy relevance. Authors will be notified by 15 November whether their abstract has been accepted.
Deadline (Papers): Authors whose abstracts have been accepted will be required to submit their full papers by 15 January 2016.
Funding for travel and accommodation will be provided to authors whose abstracts have been accepted and have also submitted full papers.

Further Details: http://www.cds.edu/idrc-sponsored-international-conference-on-development-induced-displacement-and-migration/

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Call for Participation: Astronomical Telescope Making Workshop, 05-16 October; at Kapurthala, Punjab, India

Astronomical Telescope Making Workshop
05-16 October 2015
Venue: Pushpa Gujral Science City, Kapurthala, Punjab, India


Astronomy is one of the oldest sciences concerned with the study of planets, stars, galaxies & other celestial objects and phenomena. From time immemorial the night sky has fascinated many cultures in the past including the Indians, Babylonians, Egyptians, Chinese & the Greeks and it continues to fascinate us even today. An opportunity of observing them with telescopes is quite an exciting and exhilarating experience. How about observing these objects with your own hand made telescope?
To promote such a scientific hobby and develop related skills, Vigyan Prasar in collaboration with Pushpa Gujral Science City-Kapurthala, Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA)-Pune and Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES)-Nainital is organizing a workshop on 'Astronomical Telescope Making' from 05 October to 16 October 2015 where participants will fabricate five inch (5'') Dobsonian Telescope under the close supervision and guidance of experts.
An excellent opportunity to learn telescope making and initiate observational astronomy:
1) The workshop is primarily aimed to attract professionals, amateurs and enthusiasts who would like to gain a first hand experience in the nitty-gritty of telescope making under expert supervision under one roof.
2) Successfully enrolled participants will be trained to make their own five inch (5") Dobsonian Telescope primarily from locally available material.
3) There is a provision for just 25 teams on a first come first serve basis. Each team should consist of maximum two members. Out of them one should be above the age of 18 Years.
4) After successful making of the telescope it will become property of the participants and they will take their telescope to home.
5) The last date of registration is August 15, 2015.

Workshop attractions: participants will....
1) Grind, polish glass blanks, test their own-hand-made mirrors and fabricate the dobsonian alt-azimuth mount using predominantly locally available materials. This is to impart and enhance skills to secure precise curvature, focal length and the reflecting surface.
2) Learn through night sky observations, practical sessions on how to use telescope, lectures on elementary astronomy, tips on astrophotography, interactions with eminent astronomers from various research institutions and many more.
3) Become part of a country-wide network. They will receive regular e-mail updates on astronomy activities, night sky events, and other special events including seminars/workshops/training sessions.

Registration details:
1) Each participant will have to pay a fee of  Rs.10,000.
2) If a team of two members comes together, the team have to remit a sum of Rs.12,000. The members of the team should mutually agree to share the telescope for use.
3) Payments have to be made through a Demand Draft of any nationalized bank. The draft of required amount has to be made in favor of 'Pushpa Gujral Science City, payable at Kapurthala, Punjab'
4) This fee amount is meant to cover the cost of materials that will be used to make the telescope and a working lunch over the days of the workshop.
5) Participants will have to meet their own travel, lodging & boarding expenses. However, assistance may be provided to locate a suitable accommodation depending on the requirement and the budget of the participants.
6) Only online registration is allowed at www.vigyanprasar.gov.in.
7)  List of selected participants will be displayed after deposit of registration amount.

Guidelines for online registration:
Before Filling up the Registration Form, Kindly make the Demand Draft.
1) Please fill all the entries.
2) After click in submit button, please take printout of the filled Registration form and note the reference number for future.
3) After taking print of the application form, please sign it and mention the date in the application form.
4) Send the filled application form along with Demand Draft(DD) to "Director, Pushpa Gujral Science City, Jalandhar-Kapurthala Road, Kapurthala, Punjab-144601"  on or before 15th August 2015.
5) Please write your name, reference number, mobile number on back of Demand Draft (DD).

Online Registration: http://www.vigyanprasar.gov.in/whats_new/atm-workshop/atm-entry-form.aspx

Further Details: http://www.vigyanprasar.gov.in/whats_new/atm-workshop-2015/atm-workshop-2015.htm

1st KR Narayanan Memorial Lecture on "Child Labour: A Human Rights Violation & An Impediment in Economic Growth" by Kailash Satyarthi; 3rd August

Vice-Chancellor
Jawaharlal Nehru University

Cordially invites you to the

First Dr. K. R. Narayanan Memorial Lecture

on

Child Labour: A Human Rights Violation
and
An Impediment in Economic Growth

by
Sh. Kailash Satyarthi
Recipient of Nobel Peace Prize & Human Rights Activist

on Monday, 3 August, 2015
at 05:25pm
at Auditorium-I, Convention Centre, JNU

Programme:

5:25pm - Welcome - Prof. Sudha Pai, Rector

5:35pm - Reflection on LIfe & Works of Dr. K. R. Narayanan
                 Sh. S. N. Sahu,
Joint Secretary Rajya Sabha Secretariat, Parliament of India

5:42pm - Inaugural address - Prof. S. K. Sopory, Vice-Chancellor

5:50pm - Lecture - Mr. Kailash Satyarthi

6:35pm - Question & Answer session

6:50pm - Vote of Thanks by Prof. Prasenjit Sen, Rector

7:00pm - Departure

Friday, July 17, 2015

Call For Papers: 2015 ASIS&T SIG/MET Student Paper Contest

Hello.

Please find attached and below the 2015 Call for Student Papers from ASIS&T SIG/MET.  Please excuse any cross postings and feel free to distribute widely.  Please direct any questions regarding the contest or submission guidelines to Kim Powell at krpowel@emory.edu

 

 2015 ASIS&T SIG/MET Student Paper Contest

 

Are you tired of preparing papers which immediately migrate into your professors' files and have not been seen ever since?

Recover your papers and send your most promising papers to the 2015 ASIST SIG/MET Student paper contest!

Purpose

SIG/MET (http://www.asis.org/SIG/SIGMET/) seeks to encourage the development and networking opportunities of all those interested in the measurement of information. This contest is intended to foster student growth and promote the generation of new ideas and research in metric-related topics, including bibliometrics, scientometrics, informetrics, and altmetrics.

 

Eligibility

The first author of contest submissions must be a full-time student at the time of submission, irrespective of ASIS&T or SIG/MET membership. SIG/MET reserves the right to request proof of enrollment. Submissions should not be published work,

 

Theme

Papers should discuss theories, methods, policies, case studies, etc. on aspects of the measurement of information production and use. Topics could include: Metric-Related Theory, Methods and new techniques, Citation and co-citation analysis, Indicators, Information visualization, Research policy, Productivity, Journals, databases and electronic publications, Collaboration/Co-authorship, Patent analysis, Knowledge and topic diffusion, Altmetrics

 

Selection

Papers will be reviewed by SIG/MET officers and advisors to the SIG/MET workshop. At least one winner will be chosen. In the past, we have also given commendation to other particularly outstanding papers. Selection criteria include the quality of the research, the presentation of the results, and the originality of the research question.

 

Prizes

The winner will be awarded a one-year membership to ASIS&T and a cash prize. Authors of highly rated papers will be invited to present their research under their own expense at the SIG/MET workshop held during the 2015 Annual ASIS&T Meeting (https://www.asist.org/events/annual-meeting/annual-meeting-2015/).

 

Format

Submissions can be of any length and format, but should ideally reflect typical standards of a journal article (i.e., approximately 6,000 words and in an appropriate citation style for the social sciences).

 

Submission & Deadline

Authors are invited to submit manuscripts by midnight EST on Monday August 31, 2015, to the following website:

https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=sigmetspc2015  

Authors will be notified about the results by September 12, 2015. For inquiries and further information please contact

Kim Powell (krpowel@emory.edu).

Call for Proposals: NMML Fellowships 2015

Call for Proposals: Nehru Memorial Museum and Library (NMML) Fellowships

The Nehru Memorial Museum and Library (NMML) offers fellowships to scholars to pursue research in (i) Modern Indian History and Contemporary Studies (ii) Perspectives in Indian Development (social, economic and cultural) and (iii) India and Changing Trends in World Economy and Polity.

The fellowships are offered at three levels: Junior Fellow, Fellow and Senior Fellow. The emoluments, including allowances, will correspond to that of Assistant Professor, Associate Professor and Professor of Central Universities, respectively. CPF/GPF facilities will be extended only to scholars having permanent jobs who take up the fellowship after taking leave without pay from their parent departments. Fellowships offered are for a duration of two years only. Fellows will be based in Delhi except for a maximum of five fellows of the total strength who may be permitted by the Selection Committee to be based outside Delhi.

QUALIFICATIONS:

Senior Fellow:: Scholars of eminence who have made a significant contribution to the knowledge in their respective fields and preferably have experience of conducting and guiding research.

Fellow: Good academic record, a Ph.D. or equivalent published work and at least five years teaching/post doctoral research experience.

Junior Fellow: These positions are open to candidates with a good academic record and/or scholarly publications, and preferably a Ph.D. degree.

Interested scholars are requested to send an application along with a note of about 2,000 words on the proposed project to be undertaken with the following information in an envelope clearly marked "Application for Fellowship" to the Director, Nehru Memorial Museum and Library, Teen Murti House, New Delhi – 110011. 1) Name. 2) Address. 3) Date of Birth. 4) Academic Record from High School onwards. 5) Details of post-graduate work and list of publications with copies of at least two recent publications. 6) Details of how employed so far and 7) Recommendations from two referees. Candidates in employment should apply through proper channel.

Applications for the current round of fellowship should reach the NMML on or before July 24, 2015. The NMML however reserves the right to accept applications that may come in even after the last date. In general, applications can be sent at any time of the year and they shall be retained on file for consideration periodically. The NMML reserves the right to invite any scholar who may not have applied to, to accept fellowship at any level to pursue research on any project in the three areas broadly defined.

Terms and Conditions (94.91 KB)

Further Details

Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Remembering Bagha Jatin: Shared legacy of India, Bangladesh awaiting recognition

A nice article

Remembering Bagha Jatin: Shared legacy of India, Bangladesh awaiting recognition

by Rup Narayan Das
Published: Jun 16, 2015 01:30 AM
http://www.bharatniti.in/article/remembering-bagha-jatin-shared-legacy-of-india-bangladesh-awaiting-recognition/54

NBR Working Paper "Intellectual Property Rights in India: Innovation and Competitiveness in the Indian Context"

Intellectual Property Rights in India: Innovation and Competitiveness in the Indian Context

by Amit Kapoor and Sankalp Sharma

NBR Working Paper, 2015


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

This paper looks at the broad contours of India's current intellectual property rights (IPR) regime and offers an assessment of the current situation as well as scenarios for continued advancement.

Main Argument

In looking at the needs for India's next stage of growth, both industry and policymakers are focusing on strategies for fostering capacity for innovation. The link between innovation and competitiveness can be clearly demonstrated at a national level, and at a subnational level there is also a growing need for understanding the dynamics of innovation and to take requisite steps accordingly. With this in mind, a stable IPR regime is the foundation of a globally competitive nation, drawing in investments, specifically from FDI. Ultimately, India will do well in the long term if it enables a robust IP ecosystem and protects the IP of its own companies. It will also provide a stable framework for multinational companies wanting to enter India. Yet there are some critical impediments, which have hampered prospects for broader acceptance of IPR norms, and if addressed may enable greater economic cooperation between countries.

Policy Implications

The first public draft of the national IP policy seeks to clear the air on a lot of issues pertaining to the Indian IPR regime and is a step in the right direction.

Future steps that could help improve the acceptability of a more robust IPR regime include actions such as establishing a special IP court with trained human resources and ensuring protection for trade secrets, as well as research that can better highlight the linkage between IP and innovation.

At present there are very few policies aimed at bettering IP and innovation potential in Indian states. Such regimes could augur well for an improvement in the investments under these regimes.

More... Taking the ongoing debate on 'India's Innovation and IP Policies' to the next level, Council recently published a working paper with The National Bureau of Asian Research (NBR). The paper titled 'Intellectual Property Rights in India:Innovation and Competitiveness in the Indian Context' looks at the broad contours of India's current intellectual property rights (IPR) regime. It validates the link between innovation and competitiveness at a national level and focuses on the need to understand the dynamics of innovation at a subnational level. It also offers an assessment of the current situation as well as scenarios for continued advancement.

The paper looks at the overarching laws and protections afforded to specific types of IP in India. It examines the present scenario, both theoretically as well as through data and analysis, to provide a quick assessment of India's present IPR regime. Also, bringing to light a case study of fostering innovation in India's pharmaceutical sector. The paper lastly concludes by putting forth solutions for removing bottlenecks and helping India to create a more robust and stable IPR regime.

Download the PDF

Tech Monitor "Science, technology and innovation for inclusive development: Reorganising the national and regional systems of innovation"


Science, technology and innovation for inclusive development: Reorganising the national and regional systems of innovation
by V.G.R. Chandran, Ng Boon Kwee, Wong Chan Yuan and Thiruchelvam Kanagasundaram
Asia-Pacific Tech Monitor, 2015, 14-19.

Abstract: This article aims to discuss on how universities, research institutions and research councils can take a more proactive role in promoting inclusive development within a nation and across borders. The authors argue that there is a need for regional coordination mechanism (RCM) to effectively promote cross-border science, technology and innovation initiatives that align with the national inclusive development agendas. The authros further argue for the reorganisation of the existing RCM for sustainable development agendas. Some lessons were drawn, from case studies, on the features of an effective regional coordination mechanism.
Download: http://www.techmonitor.net/tm/images/9/9d/15jan_mar_sf1.pdf

Diagnonis of National Innovation Systems: selected methods and approaches for strategy development
Compiled by Asian and Pacific Centre for Transfer of Technology
Asia-Pacific Tech Monitor, 2015, 27-30.

Download: http://www.techmonitor.net/tm/images/4/48/15jan_mar_sf3.pdf

An Indian ombudsman institution for ethics in scientific R&D

An Indian ombudsman institution for ethics in scientific R&D
Shirish A. Ranade and Nikhil Kumar
Current Science, 10 JULY 2015, 109(1), 31-36.

Abstract:
Misconduct in science and technology R&D is about a less than desirable state of honesty, ethics and integrity on part of the various stakeholders, be they individual researchers or organizations (state run or private) and is a matter of concern globally. Though misconduct is a fait accompli, what is more important is the way to deal with it. Since it is a global issue there is an ample scope for learning from others' experience. Is there any well defined system in place in India or is it dealt with essentially in an adhoc manner? Here we have summarized the information about systems to deal with misconduct in case of a few countries where the misconduct in science and technology R&D is recognized as an offense meriting appropriate punitive measures and deterrents. We also show why an Ombudsman is the need for dealing with misconduct in science in India.

Download: http://www.currentscience.ac.in/Volumes/109/01/0031.pdf

Monday, July 13, 2015

Nabard -- Call for Study Proposals

Nabard -- Call for Study Proposals
National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development invites proposals for sponsored studies from Research Institutes, Universities, Business schools of national repute, etc. on following themes, as per the details given in our website [Full path: http://www.nabard.org/NewsFiles/MCID_study_proposal_English.pdf]
1) Impact & Sustainability of SHG-BLP in India
2) Status of Matured SHGs
3) Status, progress and challenges to SHG-BLP in NE states – Way forward for Microfinance
4) Comparative study on Livelihood Models for SHGs
Hard copy of the proposal/s may be forwarded to: The Chief General Manager, Micro Credit and Innovations Department, 4D, National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development, C-24, G Block, Bandra-Kurla Complex, Bandra (E), Mumbai – 400 051. Soft copies may also be forwarded to mcid@nabard.org. Last date of receipt of proposals (Hard copy) with enclosures is 14 August 2015.

CfA: Course on Research Methods in Labour Studies, 14-25 Sept, Noida

Course on Research Methods in Labour Studies
September 14-25, 2015
Venue: V.V. Giri National Labour Institute, NOIDA
Applications are invited from young teachers and researchers from universities/ colleges/ research Institutions and professionals in government organizations who intend to pursue their interests in the above areas.
No programme fee will be charged and Institute will provide to and fro sleeper class fare and free boarding and lodging in the Institute's Campus. Applications must be accompanied by no objection certificates/ recommendations of employers/ research supervisors.
The last date for receiving the applications: August 20, 2015.
Details of the Courses are available on Institute's website: www.vvgnli.org.
Application alongwith the bio-data and a brief statement of the participant's research interests on the subject may be sent to:
Mr. Amitabh Khuntia, Associate Fellow, V.V. Giri National Labour Institute, Sector-24, NOIDA-201301, Email: amitav_1@rediffmail.com


Sunday, July 12, 2015

Sylff Leadership Initiatives: Call for Applications

Sylff Leadership Initiatives: Call for Applications

1. The Sylff Philosophy

Issues of pressing concern today are becoming more and more intertwined with other complex, global-scale problems, and no one country can resolve them alone. The parties affected by the problems may not all have the same values and interests or share economic or political orientations. Underlying the Sylff philosophy is the desire to support "leaders" with the passion and ability to serve the common interests of humanity, transcending narrow national, religious, ethnic, and other differences to undertake socially constructive leadership initiatives and act in an inclusive manner, respecting diversity in cultures and values.

2. About Sylff Leadership Initiatives (SLI)

To encourage Sylff fellows to take initiatives that put the above philosophy into action in an effort to change society for the better, the Tokyo Foundation is pleased to announce the launch of the renewed Sylff Leadership Initiatives (SLI). The Foundation will provide financial support for activities that respect and lead to the fulfillment of the above philosophy. There are two categories of SLI activities: (1) social action projects and (2) organization of a forum, conference, seminar, or workshop. Category (2) projects should be aimed at the betterment of society, although they may be academic in nature. An important consideration in screening your application is whether or not the project has been launched under your own initiative. For examples of past SLI activities, see "Awardees & Reports." (http://www.tokyofoundation.org/sylff/support_programs/sli/awardees-reports) Please note that SLI, in its current manifestation, cannot be used to finance "straight research" activities.

3. Eligibility Requirements

(1) Applications must be submitted by one or more current/graduated Sylff fellows.

(2) The proposed project must be geared toward making a contribution to society.

(3) SLI awards may be used for various activities associated with (1) social action projects and (2) forum projects, but they are not designed to support research activities.

4. SLI Awards

(1) The maximum support per project is $10,000. Extra funding may be provided in special cases if requested by the applicant and approved by the Foundation.

(2) An SLI award may be used to cover the following expenses:

International travel, domestic transportation, living expenses, meeting room/hall rental, refreshments served at meetings, acquisition of resource materials, printing and copying of documents, consumables, supplies, communication costs, etc.

(Note) It may NOT be used for the following:

  • Salaries for personnel
  • Purchases of property or other assets
  • Other items as determined by the Foundation

(3) Awards will be provided for approximately five projects per year.

5. Application and Selection

(1) Period of Application

Application will be accepted throughout the year starting on April 1, 2013.

(2) Application and Screening Procedures

Application and screening procedures consist of the following two stages:

a. Preliminary Application (Concept Paper)

Applicants must submit a concept paper (no prescribed format) at least four months prior to the project's implementation (exceptions may be considered in unavoidable circumstances; please contact the Tokyo Foundation for details).

The paper must not exceed 850 words and should include:

  • Name(s) and contact information of applicant(s)
  • Issue in question, its background and significance
  • Proposed objectives and activities
  • Potential participants
  • Social relevance
  • Approximate budget and schedule
  • Summary of other funding source(s) and amount, if any

The concept paper will be reviewed by Leadership Development program officers; successful applications will proceed to the formal application stage.

b. Formal Application

Applicants whose concept papers have been approved are invited to submit a formal application consisting of the following:

  • Detailed Proposal

The detailed proposal must not exceed 2,500 words and should address the following:

- Issue: What is the key issue in question and why should you address it?

- Proposed objectives and activities: Explain your proposed objectives and activities.

- Relevance and significance: Why is the project relevant and significant to society?

- Feasibility: Provide arguments for the feasibility of the proposed project.

- Number: Indicate the number of project participants and their respective roles.

- Expected outcome: Outline expected outcomes.

- Others: Describe other aspects to help reviewers judge the proposed project.

  • Schedule
  • Bios

Submit a brief biographical sketch (within 120 words) for each applicant and other project members, including their background, current position or occupation, academic or professional interests, and role in the proposed project.

  • Two Letters of Recommendation

Submit two letters of recommendation written by those who endorse the applicants and their proposals. One of the two letters should preferably be written by a member of the Sylff steering committee, but this is not a requirement.

After reviewing the formal applications, the Tokyo Foundation may arrange for interviews with applicants and/or referees on the phone, in person, or through other formats. The Foundation will thereupon make a final decision on the award.

(3) Notification

Applicants will be notified of the results of the review so as to provide sufficient lead time for the implementation of the project.

(4) Awards Disbursement

a. The award will be disbursed directly to successful applicants.

b. An Agreement will be signed between the applicant and the Tokyo Foundation calling for more than half of the award to be paid before the project's implementation period. The percentage will be determined in consultation with the Foundation.

c. A project report, including a narrative description of the results and a financial report, shall be submitted by all applicants. The financial report must be accompanied by receipts. The remainder of the award will be paid upon the submission of the project report. Should actual expenditures turn out to be significantly less than the amount of the first disbursement, the Foundation will request a refund of the unexpended funds.

6. Others

SLI awardees will be requested to share the outcome of their projects with the Foundation and the Sylff community in a variety of formats, including articles on the Sylff website.

*Please be sure to read this page in the original language (English), not just as a translation using the "Translate" function. The Tokyo Foundation does not guarantee the accuracy or appropriateness of the translation, which is offered through Google Translate for reference purposes only.

* * *

Inquiries and applications should be directed to:

Leadership Development
The Tokyo Foundation
Attn: Sylff Leadership Initiatives Coordinator
The Nippon Foundation Bldg. 3rd Floor
1-2-2 Akasaka, Minato-ku, Tokyo 107-0052, Japan
Phone: +81-3-6229-5503 / Fax: +81-3-6229-5507
Email: leadership [a] tkfd.or.jp

* * *


The Call for Applications (Updated March 2014) is available in PDF file. Please note that the application form and related documents are available in the text version only. Download these documents from the links on this page. We accept applications throughout the year.

The Tokyo Foundation will accept inquiries related to this program via email ONLY.

- See more at: http://www.tokyofoundation.org/sylff/support_programs/sli